Copyright

All about copyright in higher education

Students, lecturers, and researchers will come across copyright. For your assignment, publication, or in the classroom, you will use sources of others. You can read all about copyright here and what this means for your work.

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It's so easy: quickly finding an image in Google and using it on your own website.
Or taking a well-written piece of text and using it in your thesis or course. Or using music of your favourite band in your own music video. In almost all cases you can speak of copyright infringement. If it seems like you have been the creator of the work, then you are guilty of plagiarism. For this reason you need to work with source references.

Quoting Styles

Quoting Styles

At different times during your study programme, you will be using sources. Academic articles, books, images, video fragments are examples of sources. Sources that you have used need to be incorporated correctly in your report or other product. You can do this by quoting or paraphrasing. There are different styles for quoting or paraphrasing, called quoting styles. When you start using text from a source, there are different ways of doing so, namely quoting or paraphrasing. Quoting is an actual, exact use of text (verbatim), image or sound. Paraphrasing or summaries is using someone else’s text in your own words. Below you will find rules for quoting correctly and paraphrasing.

The quotation styles used at the Rotterdam University of Applied Sciences are:

  • APA 
  • MLA
  • Harvard 

Quoting

Quoting 

When you are writing your text, and you use or refer to someone else’s image, sound or text, you need to do so correctly. In your current text you can make a short reference to the source, and the Works Cited Page includes the complete source reference. The Works Cited Page is simply an overview of complete list of all sources that you refer to in your text. When you start using text from a source, there are different ways of doing so, namely quoting, summarising or paraphrasing. Quoting is an actual, exact use of text (verbatim), image or sound. Paraphrasing or summaries is using someone else’s text in your own words. Below you will find rules for quoting correctly and paraphrasing.

Quoting is using a piece of text word for word from someone else’s publication. Note that it may be a piece of text, graph or image! Please see Audio/Video for more information on how to use this type of data. It is permitted to use parts of someone else’s work provided you meet the regulations of article 15 of the Copyright Act. 

To clarify the rules manuals are available about using various styles of quoting. Common characteristics are that the text includes a reference to the author’s name, year of publication, and that all sources are included in the Works Cited Page.

Paraphrasing

Paraphrasing 

Paraphrasing is using someone else’s work in your own words. In this case you still have to abide by regulations of the Copyright Act. The rules for paraphrasing and quoting are the same as for referring to sources. The text must include a reference to the author’s name, year of publication, and that all sources are included in the bibliography.



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